11 comments


  • Fabulously inspiring, motivating, and encouraging article Jerry! Thank you!

    March 29, 2013
    • Jerry Fresia

      Amazing!thanks…J

      March 29, 2013
    • Jerry Fresia

      Thank you!

      Jerry

      April 07, 2013
  • Thank you so much for writing this.
    I am just painting flowers even though it is usually not my subject. I am soooo stuck at the moment so I read your article with great interest. I noticed that I am stuck because of me trying to PAINT FLOWERS. The flower painting that I did right before this one worked out beautifully and in retrospect I noticed that I let myself go and just not insisted on THEM being flowers.
    So I will start again with this one and your article in mind.

    April 05, 2013
    • Jerry Fresia

      Great!

      Jerry

      April 07, 2013
  • Donna Robbins

    What you shared today is exactly what I’ve needed reminding of. I’m one of those who keeps getting lost in trying to copy nature (thinking I’m becoming a better painter) and then when it’s just another boring (& often bad) painting I say to myself, now why didn’t I just take a picture?
    Thank you, Jerry! I hope to get over there and study with you soon.

    April 05, 2013
  • Patti

    I quite enjoyed this gently written article because I think you are bang on right! It inspires me to go out and paint, alas it is only 5 degrees and I will have to wait. grazie

    April 06, 2013
  • Linda

    This was certainly timely for me…I’ve been working on a flower painting lately and trying to figure out how to push it beyond just the rendition of a flower. The idea of paying as much attention to the surroundings as to the subject (subject!? What subject?) is different than what I learned about setting up priorities and focal points, but it sounds right somehow because the focus is on enjoying the moment.

    Thank you for this article.

    Linda

    April 10, 2013
    • Jerry Fresia

      That’s great. You’ve got it. Keep in mind that everything is a relationship. We have seen, in endless “optical illusion” images, how one color/value looks totally different depending on what surrounds it. Ditto flowers, etc. It’s always the whole thing, the set of parts relating to one another. “What subject” or “what flowers” is the perfect reaction. It is only line and color which then enables us to paint fearlessly because the only real subject is us, as individuals, and what we feel. And when we let go and don’t think about where the thing is going, it’s a rush.

      J

      April 10, 2013
  • Thank you so very much for this article. I am captivated by the emotions flowers and all that surrounds them bring up in me. I am pulled, over and over, toward exploring them as an artist, getting lost in the painting as I try to express what it is that they’re trying to say to me. And … I’ve been frustrated at how little there is out there in the “real artist” world to help guide me in my journey. Most classes focus on landscape, and that’s all well and good, but there’s something about floral paintings that ask for more. I’m so tired of hearing about focal point and priorities–“but look at Monet,” I’ve been known to blurt out over and over, “he didn’t care about focal point”–and I bring in books of his paintings at Giverny to illustrate what I’m talking about. It gets lost. I’m now at a place in my development where I’m about to break through–I can feel it–but I haven’t quite yet caught up with it. So, I’ve been feeling a bit lost (in the bad way) and despondent and rebellious all at once. I’ve been craving advice from those ahead of me on this path, but it can seem as if I’m the only one on it sometimes. Thank you for turning and holding the lantern and giving me a glimpse of the light ahead. I am most appreciative, and, if I can get funding from grants and other sources that I’ve applied to, I will be attending one of your workshops. Your paintings and your very good writing speak to me in a way that goes down deep and shakes out the cobwebs of the “shoulds.” (BTW, one gallery owner told me a painting didn’t work because I’d left some of the canvas showing. I had used your method after ordering your book. I smiled. At least that time, I knew why I’d done what I’d done, and I knew it worked for what I was feeling when I painted. She took 5 other paintings, and that was fine, but I now know she and I have very different ideas of where I need to go with my art. That was an empowering feeling indeed.)

    June 03, 2013
    • Conchitina Miguel

      Hang in there. I think you are right. J

      June 03, 2013

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