14 comments


  • Thank you, this is helpful. Looking forward to Sunday!

    February 03, 2016
    • Fresia

      Thanks Jane. See you soon! J

      February 04, 2016
  • Thank you! Most helpful. Looking forward to next week!

    February 03, 2016
    • Fresia

      I’m pleased that this helps. J

      February 04, 2016
  • Harvey Kimmelman

    Fascinating. A clear, intelligent, way of thinking of and seeing value changes, and what you should be looking to draw on your painting surface.

    February 03, 2016
    • Fresia

      Thank you Harvey.

      February 04, 2016
  • Jovann armstrong

    Bravo! Thank you

    February 03, 2016
    • Fresia

      I’m curious what light bulbs went off in your head?

      February 04, 2016
  • costanza baiocco

    Ths is most helpful! Let’s have more of it. I struggled for a long time on separation of values and often would get lost in the underbrush. What seems on the surface so simple requires a profound shift in the atomosphere of one’s mind. As a result of studying with you for several years I understand that the only way I am able to “see” value changes is to slow down or, better yet, shut off my analytical, chattering mind, keep looking and squinting.
    I’ve started to do simple charcoal value studies aka notan. In your upcoming workshops next week in St. Petes I’m going to resist jumping into color on canvas and instead do a gesture study followed by a notan study in a sketch book. What do you think?

    February 03, 2016
    • Fresia

      Hi Costanza: only you know best what you need to do next. I’m not sure what you mean by “notan.”
      My fear is that you are making this step a big thing which will compel you to look for results and/or
      correct. Looking for results and correcting separates you from the subject. The tendency then is to over
      control. I would suggest this: don’t worry about it. It’s there in your head. Give great expression to the
      sense of play; and most of all open to or submit to nature. Ask your subject matter: “Where do you want to
      go, what do you have to tell me?”

      If we try very hard we slip into a mode of wanting to master nature. Let nature reveal to you what you need to see.

      February 04, 2016
  • Yvonne O'Reilly

    Oh boy! Are value relationships the same for each person or do you see different values in each grouping?

    February 05, 2016
    • Fresia

      Value relationships are the same, or should be, for each person. For example, the one thing that a camera can do well, if you take a black and white photo of the subject, is get the value relationships correct. What is darker (or lighter) than something else will always be so, even if everything is lighter (high key) or darker (low key). That is why you will often hear the critique of an inexperienced painter that his or her “values are off.” It is pretty basic and very important – if one wishes to achieve a sense of space. Of course, one may wish to distort and alter values and everything else that one sees, but then one would be leaving traditional painting. However, if one chooses to do that and if it is actually a “choice,” then one ought to have the ability to get the value relationships right in the first place. JF

      February 05, 2016
  • Joy McCormack

    Good explanation of seeing values and observing(seeing, feeling) nature but my comment is about a documentary on CBC (Canadian Broadcast Company). As you are in North America and as St. Pete’s has so many snow birds, they may carry a Canadian station. Naomi Klein’s book, “This Changes Everything” is the subject of the documentary on tomorrow (Thursday) evening. As you are a fan, thought you might want to catch it. Enjoy. Joy

    February 17, 2016
    • Fresia

      Thanks Joy. Yes, I am a fan of Klein – but I just saw your comment, a day late. Maybe I can find it on youtube! J

      February 18, 2016

Leave a comment


Name*

Email(will not be published)*

Website

Your comment*

Submit Comment

*

Copyright Tax & Advise Ltd