21 comments


  • Hi Jerry: At the current time, I am not able to take any workshops or get together with other artists in areas that have paint thinner. I am painting with water soluble oils and after some practice, am doing pretty well with them. I am on oxygen 24/7 but am doing really well. All this means is that your newsletter is even more inspirational than ever and I also enjoy your YouTube demos as refreshers. I am still able to travel, so maybe a day or two of private lessons is in my future with you. I can just strap my plein air easel, etc. to my portable oxygen and come on over. Hi to Conchitina

    March 17, 2012
    • Jerry Fresia

      Hi Linda, Nice to hear from you. I hope to be making some instructional videos soon. Anyway, hang in there and please
      as questions with regard to your work if you want; or we can hook up via Skype and have a look-see conversation.
      I’m glad to see you can get around with your oxygen and I suspect you are doing marvelous work based upon what I have
      seen in the past…hang in there, the future looks bright. J and C (poor ole Lupo died at 20 about a year ago!!)

      March 17, 2012
    • This is great Maya! What fun! I’m totally going to set up a caanvs and paint along with you!!!! You rock, keep up the great and inspiring work!!!!!!!!!!

      June 06, 2012
  • Jerry, this is one of the best written, most well-explained articles that I have ever read on painting. You inspire at every turn – on the feeling and heart of the artistic process and I’m grateful to have “met” you.

    I’m super interested in those prismatic edges. I do understand having to feel them and they just do appear. I’ve never heard it described that way before – for me, it’s always been a very spiritual place in the painting – an area where the “things” somehow cease becoming what they are and leak a little of their spirit into the next “thing”. I love this thought of connectivity – it’s definitely my drug.

    March 17, 2012
    • Jerry Fresia

      Thanks Janice. Glad you liked it. Bill was great and I could go on and on about his work and his teaching. Maybe I will do it again with another work of his someday. Regarding prismatic edges: 1) you really have to see them and if you don’t, don’t worry….just look for them and they will pop up every now and then; 2) go easy…..nothing is worse than a bright line that doesn’t work…..so here’s a hint: because the color happens when there is an abrupt separation between something dark and something light, the prismatic edge is part of the dark!! that is, it fits into the separation on the dark side! J

      March 17, 2012
  • enjoyed article–about brushstrokes and red orange line
    reminds me of Wayne Thiebaud–cake paintings , outlined with rings and rainbows of pure color-bright blues/reds/purples register at a distance only as a just -perceptible vibrato. He began by “drawing in color” until the original
    outlines peeked out from beneath.-Halo effect–W. Thiebaud–Nash and Gopnik

    March 17, 2012
    • Jerry Fresia

      Interesting Jorge; I know what you mean. I doubt that Thiebaud was seeing those vibrato type lines but I would also guess that they are, indeed, base upon prismatic color. Once you see these things, you can go in any direction and Thiebaud is a great example. J

      March 17, 2012
    • Great video Pete and a promising look at your enictixg techniques. I’ve been checking out your web site and look forward to when the videos are fully operational. thanks great work.again, your techniques are enictixg to watch, I’m hoping to put some to use in my work.

      June 06, 2012
  • Really great lesson for any painter. Thanks so much for including them in your mail outs. I hope one day to join your workshop for a session as I’m sure I would learn much.
    Thanks again and keep them coming sir.

    Steve Paschal
    Mililani Hawaii

    March 17, 2012
    • Jerry Fresia

      Thanks Steve. Nice to hear from you. J

      March 17, 2012
    • Bud

      As a very sad neighbor of Hana’s, I aeripcpate how you captured the feeling. I did not know her, but am haunted by the idea that she was so close and yet so far. You have captured the haunting loneliness and isolation that she must have felt. Thank you.

      June 07, 2012
  • Hi Jerry. Enjoyed the best explanation I have ever read and understood reference to the anatomy of painting.You have a special gift simplifying the art of observation, and not being a slave to the subject matter in front of you.Looking forward to more of your pearls of wisdom.regards new fan Larry

    March 18, 2012
    • Jerry Fresia

      Thanks Larry. My bent is to get more into the philosophical side of things but I get more responses from the “how to” commentary. More practical I suppose. So I may do more. Of course, analyzing Bill’s work is a piece of cake and I could go on forever given that I studied with him for so long. Besides, it is worth pointing to a few things that so many people might miss.

      March 18, 2012
    • Thank you so much. This is very powerful. Everybodys cenmomt and expression warms my heart. Thanks God there are so many caring and loving humanbeings around. We will outnumber the evil and bring justice for Hana Alemu.

      June 07, 2012
  • Bud Lambert

    Jerry,

    I have very fond memories of my uncle Johnny, aka, Bill Schultz. He was a great artist and I was always impressed with how quickly he could put a painting down and get his colors and feelings so accurate. Thanks for explaining to others about his talents and gifts, not to mention the nicest artist I’ve ever known.

    Thanks again,

    Bud

    March 19, 2012
    • Jerry Fresia

      Thanks Bud; it is very easy to sing the praises of Bill, as nearly all his students would agree. I often wondered what I would be doing and how different my life would be had I not met him. And I’m sure there are hundreds out there who would say the same. I could never figure out which he was better at, teaching or painting. He was amazing in both. But he himself said that while he could live without painting he couldn’t live without teaching. So I suppose that explains the impact that he had. He was one of the greats. No doubt about it.

      March 19, 2012
  • I love your site and the way you describe the posecrs of making your artwork. Even though you planned to make it look like a particular flower and it turned out to look different than your plan, it proves that it is true art. Your final painting is beautiful.

    June 06, 2012
  • Larry Huggins

    Hi Jerry,

    It’s been s long time since you helped me with my painting back in San Francisco. The lessons stayed with me, and helped my drawing, too.

    Larry a Huggins

    February 27, 2015
    • Jerry Fresia

      Larry – how are you??? Nice to hear from you. Glad you have stuck with it. Great. Say hello to your wife. Best to you both.

      Jerry

      May 16, 2015
  • Hi Jerry,
    Bill Schultz is my mother’s first cousin. She always called him Johnny. They were close friends during their childhood and she collected his art as an adult. She is 100 now and most of her paintings are hanging in my house. She often talked about how hefirst learned to paint at the Boys Club in Pittsfield, MA back in the 1920s. So much fun to find this blog about his technique and his devotion to being an artist.
    Thanks for writing this!
    Best regards,
    Jan Krause Greene

    October 06, 2015
    • Jerry Fresia

      Hi Jan, So nice for you to write. Yes, I heard that his nickname was “Johnny” and he used to tell us how his Boy’s Club card cost only 5 cents for the entire year. Best to you. Jerry

      October 07, 2015

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